Science

The Science Curriculum comprises Life Sciences, Chemistry and Physics at a level appropriate to each age group.  A specialist laboratory is available for practical small-group teaching so Forms are often subdivided for this subject.  Whenever appropriate pupils are directed to enjoy practical activities in the Airthrie garden.

In common with other subjects, the curriculum is based on the requirements of the National Curriculum and utilises the skills of specialist subject teachers.

Airthrie Science Curriculum

Science is taught through relevant practical activities to encourage scientific thinking and enhance scientific knowledge.

KEY STAGE 1

During Years 1 and 2 pupils are taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of each programme of study:

Year 1 - Form Ash

Plants

Pupils are taught to:

Animals including humans

Everyday materials

Pupils are taught to:

Seasonal changes

Pupils should be taught to:

Year 2 - Form Beech

Living things and their habitats

Pupils are taught to:

Plants

Pupils are taught to:

Animals, including humans

Pupils are taught to:

Uses of everyday materials

Pupils are taught to:


KEY STAGE 2

Pupils in Years 3-6 are given a range of scientific experiences to enable them to raise their own questions about the world around them.  They start to make their own decisions about the most appropriate type of scientific enquiry they might use to answer questions, recognise when a simple fair test is necessary and help to decide how to set it up, talk about criteria for grouping, sorting and classifying and use simple keys.  They look for naturally occurring patterns and relationships and decide what data to collect to identify them.  They make decisions about what observations to make, how long to make them for and the type of simple equipment that might be used.

They learn how to use new equipment appropriately. They collect data from their own observations and measurements, using notes, tables and standard units, and help to make decisions about how to record and analyse this data.  Pupils look for changes, patterns, similarities and differences in their data in order to draw simple conclusions and answer questions.  They identify new questions arising from the data, make predictions for new values within or beyond the data they have collected and finding ways of improving what they have already done.  They also recognise when and how secondary sources might help them to answer questions that cannot be answered through practical investigations.  Pupils use relevant scientific language to discuss their ideas and communicate their findings in ways that are appropriate for different topics.

Each year group follows their own programme of study, each topic building upon previous experiences to enhance progress.

Year 3 - Form Cedar

Pupils are taught to:

Animals including humans

Pupils are taught to:

Rocks

Pupils are taught to:

Light

Pupils are taught to:

Forces and magnets

Pupils are taught to:

Year 4,  Forms Larch and Spruce

Living things and their habitats

Pupils are taught to:

Animals including humans

Pupils are taught to:

States of matter

Pupils are taught to:

Sound

Pupils are taught to:

Electricity

Pupils are taught to:

Year 5 - Forms Alder and Poplar

Living things and their habitats

Pupils are taught to:

Properties and changes of materials

Pupils are taught to:

Earth and space

Pupils are taught to:

Forces

Pupils are taught to:

Year 6 - Forms Oak H and Oak W

Living things and their habitats

Pupils are taught to:

Describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals.

Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Animals including humans

Pupils are taught to:

Evolution and inheritance

Pupils are taught to:

Light

Pupils are taught to:

Electricity

Pupils are taught to:

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