Dallington

Forest Leader:  Mrs Pauline Drury

Dallington Forest is a  SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest), located in East Sussex, England and is an area of ancient woodland.  The soil provides perfect conditions for the growth of a wide variety of deciduous trees and associated flora found in only three locations in Britain.   The main feature of the forest is its warm, moist micro-climate found in the ghyll which in the past has provided the raw materials used to manufacture charcoal, an important source of fuel for the Wealden iron-making industry.  

Our song and motto 

Dallington, Dallington
The forest of the south
Dallington, Dallington
Our trees are tall and stout.
We always try our best
To help and serve the rest.
Dallington, Dallington, Dallington

We do our best to make gatherings fun and happy occasions with all the children from Reception to Year 6 able to contribute in some way (Year 6 members are given the responsibility of caring for the younger children and keeping the ‘swap book’ up-to-date).  Gaining leaf points is encouraged in all aspects of everyday School life, not only in academic attainment but also in showing attributes such as kindness, helpfulness and friendliness.  Our woodland banner reflects our love of the forest with badgers, hedgehogs and squirrels all featuring.  

When fund-raising, we try to choose a charity that is personal in some way to the Dallington children.  So far, we have supported Riding for the Disabled, Maggie's and The Milestone School.  We discuss local customs, have enjoyed a visit from Morris dancers and have attempted maypole dancing.  We take note of special events and celebrations and try to incorporate these into our meetings, such as HM The Queen's 90th birthday, any Royal weddings and Remembrance Sunday.  We often make collages to depict these events, which are displayed around School.

In our meetings, we do our best to acknowledge any awards the children have been presented with and celebrate their achievements as they would with their family. 

Read more